Canberra Countryside

I traveled to Canberra last week, and now have a new-found appreciation for the public  transportation in Melbourne! Don’t get me wrong, Canberra is a lovely and beautiful (and very quiet!) city, but I don’t think it’s possible to live there without a car.  Of course, I’m basing this on about 3 days of wandering around, but, that’s my first impression. Needless to say, there were lots of taxi rides.

Hotel Christmas Tree

Still, I had a fun time visiting Australia’s capital. For one, my hotel was all decorated for the season! Also, I got some shopping done and bought some lights for my apartment, which was a definite win.

Over the weekend a friend drove me out of the city, and we headed to Gundaroo (doesn’t that just sound like it’s in Australia?!), which is a quaint little village out in the countryside, home to wineries and fresh yumminess!

Canberra Countryside

At the appropriately named restaurant Grazing, we got this lovely fresh food platter, and I enjoyed it with some wines from Capital winery‘s Ministry series. I tried a nice Riesling (The Whip) and a delicious Tempranillo (The Ambassador).  Verdict: I just might have to order a whole case.

Platter of yummy food

I promise on my next visit to Canberra I will make it out of the one circle I spent this trip in, to explore the art galleries and many mini districts of cafes, bars, and restaurants.  For now, you’ll just have to settle with the fact that I noticed the Old Parliament House and the new (current) Parliament House via taxi ride drive by and leave it at that.

Restaurant

Yarra Valley Wine Tour

This weekend I headed out to Yarra for a wine tour. The valley is famous for the over 70 wineries.

First stop: Yering station!

If you have to ask if its too early to drink wine you are an amateur and we cannot be friends. (They had this quote on the wall and I really identified with it :p).

First wine: Marsanne Viognier roussanne (white), which is a blend of 3 wines I’ve never tried before. It was awesome! We also indulged in a Pinot noir, off dry riesling and Shiraz.

Next stop was balgownie estate, where we stopped for another tasting and a delicious lunch! I had a lovely cab merlot with my braised beef, and a fortified Shiraz (like a port but not!).

After that we headed to a smaller winery which also has some apple orchards. Their 2006 vintage Pinot noir was delicious, and they even deliver to Melbourne. They get bonus points for having a cute dog mascot.

The last stop was Chandon, which is actually certified to make champagne, which is great if you’re in to that kind of thing!

Overall it’s great to have so many options of wineries right outside Melbourne to enjoy, and the valley is a must see for anyone transiting through 🙂

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Nature Walkabout

After the joys of seeing some animals at the Moonlit Sanctuary, I was really excited when I found a tour for seeing them in the wild!  There are some protected spaces near Melbourne in the Great Western Planes which are natural habitats for kangaroos and koalas, so I headed out for a full day of wandering around with a researcher guide and seeing what we could spot.Birds

We ended up seeing so much wildlife, I think it’s best to just make a list!

  • 3 koalas spotted napping in trees,
  • 2 wallabees jumping through the countryside,
  • A mob of Eastern Grey kangaroos lounging in the shade,
  • An echidna waddling through the forest,
  • A kookaburra singing in the trees,
  • A jacky lizard darting under a bridge,
  • Birds a plenty, including magpies, willie wagtails, and a group of emus,
  • A whistling kite flying off with a snake!

It’s one thing to see an animal in a zoo or enclosure where you know they’re going to be there, but it’s quite another to try and traipse through a large forest looking for animals that are specialized for hiding.  Here’s the “Where’s Waldo?” Edition of my tour—can you spot the koala, kangaroo, and echida in these photos?

Photos of echidna, koala and kangaroo

The researchers who work in these parks note the GPS coordinates if the find a koala, so that the next researcher with a tour group can try to see if they can find it in the same spot.  Since koalas are very restful, they might be in the same tree for several hours.  Even with GPS tracking, it can still be tough to navigate the forest and find them. The tour I went on was small- there were only five of us, plus our guide, who is a trained researcher.  Because of this, the tour was very focused on conservation efforts and respecting the animals.  We were sure to keep a safe distance from any animals we did find so that we didn’t make them nervous.  It also ended up being one of the most educational tours I’ve ever been on.  Did you know that you can identify individual koalas by the patterns on the inside of their nose that are unique to each one? This of course requires you to get the right angle with binoculars, but the researchers have named many of the koalas they have found, and could tell us if they were young or old, and history about them, which was really fascinating.

Koala

We ended up spotting three different koalas on our tour through the You Yangs, which is pretty amazing considering how difficult they can be to see up in the trees!

Echidna

Now on to the echidna- this animal has quills like a porcupine, but eats ants and can burrow into the ground to hide.  Also, if it feels endangered, it will protect itself by moving into a ball, only exposing its quills to the outside.  Because of all their survival techniques, they can be incredibly difficult to spot, so imagine our delight when we actually saw one! I even got a video of it waddling around.

Panorama at You Yangs

We stopped by a lookout and could see the whole area from high up, which was a spot for indigenous groups to gather.  The rock ledge still had a well they made to gather water on top of the rocks.

Hawk

After so much wildlife fun, it was time to sit down for a nice lunch. The park we were in has a great picnic area, so if you’re in Melbourne and want a little hike through some nice terrain right outside the city, this is definitely good to keep in mind. Our picnic lunch was interrupted though, when we saw a bird of prey (our guide identified it as a whistling kite) fly off with a snake in its talons! Looks like were weren’t the only ones enjoying lunch J.  The bird came back a bit later and I got a quick photo of it.

kangaroos

After we left the koala forest, we headed to a different area, the Serendip Sanctuary, where wallabies, kangaroos, and a whole host of birds live.   Here we walked around and found a mob of kangaroos. Did you know that male kangaroos never stop growing?  If they live long enough, they can end up being quite large, and one of them from the group we found was indeed very tall!

kangaroos hopping away

Walking through the natural habitats was so peaceful, and it’s really great to see these areas that have been protected and made into natural areas for these animals.  Researchers still predict that in 20 years, there might not be any koalas in the wild, because of loss of natural habitat. They are very selective of which types of eucalyptus leaves they will eat, and their populations can be severely affected by the bush fires that rage through the Australian forests in the summer.  I did my small part to help them on the tour- we pulled up Boneseed, which is an invasive weed that threatens the koala habitats, and hope that they can be protected in the future!

Eums

If you want to know more about the tour I took, here is the company website for Echidna tours http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/